Home > Firearms > Winchester Firearms >

Winchester Model 70 Featherweight - 300 Win
Winchester Model 70 Featherweight - 300 Win
 
Alternative Views


Tech Specs at a Glance:

Caliber: 300 Win Mag
Trigger: Adjustable
Stock: Composite
Barrel Length: 24 in
Twist Rate: 1 in 10 inch
Total Length: 44.75 in
Weight: 7 lbs 4oz


Refer to the "Technical Info" tab below for additional specifications.

Our Price: $1,299.00
Firearm Classification: Valid P.A.L required to purchase

Quantity Available:1


Caliber:


Description Technical Info
 

Winchester Model 70 Featherweight - 300 Win :

The legendary handling and quickness of the Model 70 Featherweight. Few rifles can be identified in an instant like the Featherweight. It is justly famous among hunters everywhere. The Model 70 action offers Pre 1964 style Controlled Round Feeding, a Three-Position Safety and is highlighted by a jeweled bolt body with knurled bolt handle. Inside is the M.O.A. Trigger System, the finest trigger ever offered in a bolt-action with zero take up, zero creep and zero overtravel. Like the original Featherweight, the angled comb Grade I walnut stock still features the Schnabel fore-end and satin finish with elegant cut checkering. A premium Pachmayr Decelerator pad helps soak up felt recoil. Its available in the most popular long and short action calibers, including WSM chamberings.

Be part of the ongoing generation of Featherweight owners. Generations of serious hunters have made the Model 70 Featherweight the iconic all-around rifle for any hunt. Easy-to-carry, accurate and utterly reliable, the Featherweight is ideal for deer, varmints, hogs and antelope. No other bolt-action in history can inspire the passion, command the loyalty or create a sense of excitement among dedicated marksmen like the Model 70. Since 1936 its been the benchmark against which every other bolt-action rifle is measured. Discover the riflemans rifle for yourself.

Three-quarters of a century of total performance is what comes with every Winchester Model 70. Today's Model 70 has the addition of the M.O.A. Trigger System, improved fit and finish and enhanced accuracy to go along with its classic Pre-1964 controlled round feeding. It is all there: Three-Position Safety and solid, sure handling. The M.O.A. Trigger helps the model 70 deliver the extreme accuracy benchmark 1" group at 100 yards. Its what you deserve.

With the Triple Zero Advantage.The Model 70s new M.O.A. Trigger System is the most precise three-lever trigger system in the world. Operating on a simple pivoting lever principle, the trigger mechanism has been completely redesigned to exhibit zero take up, zero creep and zero overtravel. The pull weight ranges from 3 to 5 pounds and is factory-set at 3 3/4 pounds. Because of the enhanced ergonomics, wide smooth triggerpiece and 2:1 mechanical advantage created by the unique design geometry, it actually feels like half that weight. Click "Read More" below for the rest of the story.

The Model 70 still has the famous 3-position safety which is convenient to operate with the thumb of your firing hand, lifting the firing pin away from the sear. When the safety is in the intermediate or middle position, the action can still be operated, allowing unfired cartridges to be cycled with the safety on. It's smooth to engage and easily identifies the safety status of the rifle.

A blade-type ejector gives you full control when ejecting a fired case. If you pull the bolt back slowly, the empty case doesn't fly anywhere, so you can catch it in your hand and the case is not damaged as it hits the ground. If you pull the bolt back quickly, it ejects the cartridge with more force, throwing it well clear of the action.

The forged steel receiver starts as a forged from a solid block of steel. (What could be stronger?) This is expensive to do, but the regal Model 70 is worth it. Each finished forging is precisely machined, creating a strong, stiff and solid receiver that resists flexing and delivers uncanny accuracy. The bottom profile of this receiver is flat to offer greater surface area for bedding. It is bedded with a two-part epoxy in two places, at the front and rear to keep things from shifting around inside the stock during firing. Why all this trouble and time? So pinpoint accuracy is preserved.

If there were a single feature responsible for the Model 70 being known as the "Bolt-Action Rifle of the Century," it would be the classic Controlled Round Feed (CRF) bolt design. This is a massive claw extractor that smoothly slips onto and secures about one-quarter of the base of the cartridge. This exerts full control over the cartridge from the time it leaves the magazine, as it enters the chamber, gripping tightly until the cartridge is fully ejected. This design also allows an unfired cartridge to be extracted even if it is not yet fully chambered. It's another feature found on the Model 70.

Most rifles have a recoil lug that is installed between the barrel and the action, much like a washer on a bolt. It is a metal piece that extends below the receiver and fits into a matching recess in the stock. It helps spread out the hammering effects of recoil across a wider surface so the rifle won't be damaged. The recoil lug in the Model 70 is not added during assembly. It's forged and machined as part of the receiver. This allows the barrel to be trued in perfect alignment to the front ring of the receiver for greater accuracy. There is nothing to move or shift the barrel out of alignment, ever.

A rifle is not worth a grain of powder if its barrel is of low quality, either from inferior steel, poor workmanship or poor fit. Every Model 70 barrel is cold hammer-forged from a solid blank of high-grade steel, shaped by heavy, massive rotary hammers over a mandrel (a metal bar that serves as a core around which steel is forged and shaped). After this, each barrel is stress-relieved to ensure accuracy stays straight, even during the heat of rapid firing.

Free-floating a barrel in the stock means no part of the forearm area touches the barrel. The slightest pressure from the forearm as it cradles the barrel can adversely influence accuracy. Try pulling a dollar bill under your current rifle's barrel. Does it slip all the way to the receiver without hangup? If not, you're missing the kind of accuracy that produces results in the field.


Features & Design

  • True Timber Strata camo finish
  • Permacote flat dark earth finish
  • Drilled and tapped for scope mounts
  • Precision button rifled barrel
  • M.O.A. trigger system
  • Nickel Teflon coated bolt
  • Detachable box magazine
  • Composite stock with Textured gripping surfaces
  • Inflex recoil pad

300 Win Mag

The .300 Winchester Magnum (also known as .300 Win Mag or 300WM) (7.62x67mm) is a popular, belted, bottlenecked magnum rifle cartridge that was introduced by Winchester Repeating Arms Company in 1963 as a member of the family of Winchester Magnum cartridges. The .300 Winchester Magnum is a magnum cartridge designed to fit in a standard length action. It is based on the .375 H&H Magnum, which has been blown out, shortened, and necked down to accept a .30 caliber (7.62 mm) bullet.

The .300 Winchester is extremely versatile and has been adopted by a wide range of users including hunters, target shooters, military units, and law enforcement departments. Hunters found the cartridge to be an effective all-around choice with bullet options ranging from the flatter shooting 165 grain to the harder hitting 200+ grain selections available from the factory. The .300 Win Mag remains the most popular .30 caliber magnum with North American hunters, despite being surpassed in performance by the more powerful .300 Weatherby Magnum and the newer .300 Remington Ultra Magnum. It is a popular selection for hunting moose, elk, and bighorn sheep as it can deliver better long range performance with better bullet weight than most other .30 caliber cartridges. Military and law enforcement departments adopted the cartridge for long range sniping and marksmanship. As a testament to its accuracy, since its introduction it has gone on to win several 1,000-yard (910 m) competitions

Suggested Use

  • Deer (long range)
  • Black Bear (long range)
  • Sheep / Goat (long range)
  • Moose
  • Elk
  • Buffalo / Bison

Performance

The Winchesters factory ammunition for the .300 Winchester Magnum is capable of 3,260 feet per second (990 m/s) with the 150-grain (9.7 g) bullet and 3,000 ft/s (910 m/s) with the 180-grain (12 g) bullet. The maximum point blank range for the 150 gr (9.7 g) bullet is 318 yards (291 m) yards when zeroed at 270 yards (250 m). The maximum point blank range for the 180 gr (12 g) bullet is 300 yards when zeroed at 254 yards (232 m). The ability to zero the .300 Winchester Magnum and shoot without hold over to 300 yards (270 m) makes the cartridge one of the flatter shooting cartridges.

The .30 caliber is the most popular caliber in the United States. So it is not surprising that the widest range of bullets available is in the .30 caliber. The most useful bullet weights for the .300 Winchester Magnum are those weighing between 150 to 200 grains (9.7 to 13.0 g). However, bullets weighing between 110 to 250 gr (7.1 to 16.2 g) are available to the reloader for the .300 Winchester Magnum.

Compared with the 30-06 Springfield the .300 Winchester Magnum provides a nearly 300 ft/s (91 m/s) increase in velocity. This translates to about 20% greater energy advantage over the 30-06 Springfield cartridge. Due to the short neck, heavier bullets particularly those weighing greater than 200 grains (13 g) and mono-metal bullets such as the Barnes X bullets will need to be seated more deeply into the cartridge. As the bullet will take up volume which could have been taken by the propellant velocity advantages diminish as the weight of the bullet increases.

The .300 Winchester Magnum is known for its accuracy and has been used for 1,000-yard (910 m) and 1,000-metre (1,100 yd) competitions. While in hunting situations such accuracy is unnecessary, such accuracy does aid in the extending the range of the cartridge. Taken together with its performance it remains one of the most useful and popular cartridges today.

Although cartridges such as the .30-378 Weatherby Magnum, .300 Remington Ultra Magnum and the .300 Weatherby Magnum all exceed performance of the .300 Winchester Magnum none of these cartridges can be chambered in a standard length action. Few .30 caliber (7.62 mm) standard length cartridges can match the performance and versatility of the .300 Winchester Magnum.

The down side to this performance is recoil. The amount of recoil the cartridge generates is a step up from the non-magnum .30 caliber (7.62 mm) cartridges. Its recoil is about 30% greater than that of the .30-06 Springfield, which is known as a 'stout' cartridge. This would put the .300 Winchester Magnum at the upper limit of what most shooters can shoot comfortably for extended shooting sessions. As a rough comparison, the recoil of the .300 Winchester Magnum is roughly comparable to a 12 gauge shotgun shooting 1 oz. slugs. This greater recoil can make the .300 Winchester Magnum, despite its inherent accuracy advantages, a harder cartridge to shoot accurately, when compared to non-magnum .30 caliber cartridges such as the .30-06 Springfield or the .308 Winchester. On the other hand, recoil is subjective (some are more sensitive to it than others) and one can get used to it with practice. Also, many rifles available today now have effective recoil attenuating features built into them, such as muzzle compensators and energy absorbing stocks and butt-pads, that can significantly lessen recoil as it is felt by the shooter.